How to Check Your Heart Rate Using Your Own EKG Monitor

Doctor holding a digital tablet with a live recorded ecg on it. On the desk in the background is a stethoscope.

The healthy lub-dub sound of your heart valves is one that many people take for granted until they experience or are diagnosed with a heart condition. Things like arrhythmia (irregular heart rate), valvular disease (damage or defects in one of your heart valves), or a history of heart attacks can cause you to become concerned about your cardiac health. As a result, you may want to become more proactive about monitoring your heart rate. Thanks to medical technology, you no longer have to go to the doctor to have an electrocardiogram. You can purchase your own EKG monitor and use it in your own home at your convenience.

What is an At-Home EKG monitor?

An at-home EKG monitor is a portable monitor that you can easily use at home. Sometimes, you can just hold your fingers on the device’s sensors to check your heart rate. Depending on the model you choose, your device may be able to send results to your doctor via Wi-Fi, or transfer the results over the telephone. EKG monitors offer convenience and flexibility, allowing you to deliver your results to your doctor without leaving your home.

Popular At-Home EKG Monitors

There are many at-home EKG monitors available on the market today. They vary based on technological complexity, cost, and the way in which they deliver information to medical professionals. Here are a few inexpensive EKG monitors that you can use in your own home:

  • EMAY portable EKG: This EKG is very inexpensive at $99, and it doesn’t require a smartphone for use. However, it does have smart capabilities to connect with your electronic devices and share with your doctor. One physician indicated that a wonderful feature of this device was clear guidelines as to which readings mean a person needs to get to the emergency room. 
  • AliveCor Kardia Mobile: AliveCor’s model is even less expensive than EMAY’s at $89. It also uses finger/hand sensors for easy, medical-grade readings. The company advertises FDA-approved algorithms. Some customers complain that there is an eventual requirement to pay for a monthly service to fully use the device. 
  • SonoHealth Portable EKG: This portable EKG is much more complex and includes finger sensors and chest leads, which can detect a greater number of abnormalities. 
  • ViATOM’s ECG Monitor: ViATOM’s portable electrocardiogram may be useful for some, but others indicated that it picked up a lot of “noise” that interfered with readings. Other positive reviews indicated it was very simple to use. 
  • Vive Precision EKG Monitor: This EKG is also small, portable, rechargeable, and easy-to-use. It’s the least expensive at $79.99 and connects to smart devices. Some reviewers reported inaccurate readings, but others stated it worked as intended. 

When to Go to the Emergency Room

Talk to your doctor about your specific heart condition, and which symptoms or indicators on the EKG monitor will tell you that you need to get to the emergency room immediately. In many cases, a healthcare professional from the doctor’s office will call you and tell you to get to the ER, after receiving an important medical alert reading from your at-home EKG. That is why it is so important to keep a portable EKG at home, so you can monitor your heart rate, and your doctor can monitor your heart rate, anytime day or night, without you having to schedule a doctor’s appointment.

For more informative articles on healthcare, follow the Avidity Medical Design Blog. To take an online healthcare course, visit the Avidity Medical Design Academy website.

What You Need to Know About Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems If You Are a Diabetic

person's hand holding phone with glucose graph near continuous glucose monitoring sensor placed in upper arm

If you are a diabetic, trying to manage your diabetes doesn’t have to be hard.

Finger prick monitoring shows accurate in-the-moment insulin levels but continuous glucose monitors (CGM) allow you to see trends and observe the impacts of your diet and activities on your levels. Choosing the right continuous glucose monitor (CGM) can be overwhelming, though. Have you found the right one for you? Let’s go over the options so you can reach an informed decision. 

Many of the basic features of CGMs are the same. Let’s review what those are before looking at what’s unique about the most popular options on the market. They all come with a subcutaneous sensor and transmitter which connects wirelessly to a receiver. Receivers have trend graphs, direction and rate-of-change arrows, as well as the ability to log extra data. Sensors are inserted with a device and may be re-usable. Data is sent to the receiver whenever it’s in range. 

Here are the top 4 continuous glucose monitoring systems that you might want to consider if you are a diabetic:

1. Senseonics Eversense CGM

The Senseonics Eversense CGM has the least medical waste, as the transmitter can be changed without removing the sensor, which is guaranteed for 90 days. The sensor needs to be changed at a physician’s office, though and has 24 hours before it is warmed up. It also needs calibration twice daily. There are great functions that keep you informed such as vibrate or audio real-time alerts for out of range, high, low, rate of change, or predictive low. It is also not impacted by acetaminophen. 

2. Freestyle Libre 14-hour CGM

The Freestyle Libre 14-hour CGM doesn’t need daily calibration, is the most inexpensive, and has the shortest warm-up of one hour. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have real-time high/low alerts and without that calibration, is the most inaccurate in low glucose range. The sensor can store up to 8 hours of data and the reader can store notes and events but they must be entered at the time. The low profile transmitter has an adhesive that may not last the 14 days of the sensor life. It can also be impacted by vitamin C and aspirin. 

3. Medtronic Guardian3 – 670G or Guardian Connect CGM

The Medtronic Guardian3 – 670G or Guardian Connect CGM has a reusable sensor with a life of 7 days. It has a single button insertion with a 2-hour warm-up time but can cause skin issues with complicated multiple tapes. There are customizable alerts for different times and days with vibrate and audio limited only by your phone’s options. There are real-time alerts for high, low, rate of change, or predictive low/high. It needs calibration every twelve hours to continue data generation. Guardian Connect only works with Apple apps but has real-time sharable data as well as an app that generates reports. It’s also impacted by acetaminophen. 

4. Dexcom G6 CGM

The Dexcom G6 CGM does not need calibration but it is available to improve accuracy. The sensor has a single push button insertion and is good for 10 days. It has customizable alerts including an “always on” feature for if your phone is on silent. It has a high level of waste from the costly sensors and transmitters, and reusing the sensor can be difficult. 

For more information on different healthcare topics, follow the Avidity Medical Design Blog. To take a healthcare course, visit Avidity Medical Design Academy.

What You Should Know About Telehealth in the Era of COVID-19

person-holding-smartphone-during-telehealth-appointment-with-doctor-on-video

There have been dramatic changes to the medical landscape since COVID-19 was declared a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. One of the most significant changes that practitioners have experienced is an increase in flexibility in administering telehealth patient services.

What is Telehealth?

The World Health Organization (WHO) applies telehealth and telemedicine synonymously to describe the use of information and communications technology to overcome geographical barriers to patient care to improve health outcomes. This definition accounts for both clinical and non-clinical functions.

In telehealth appointments, you connect remotely with a provider to seek diagnosis, treatment, or monitoring of your health concerns. Telehealth is best applied in situations where you’re seeking follow-up monitoring on a pre-existing condition, or your symptoms aren’t emergent. 

Advantages and Disadvantages of Telehealth

Like anything, using telehealth for patient care comes with pros and cons

Advantages of using telehealth include things like:

  • Increased health care accessibility.
  • Ability for greater collaboration among healthcare teams.
  • Decreased risk for exposure to unrelated illnesses like COVID-19.

Disadvantages consist of factors such as:

  • No physical exams performed.
  • Risks for delayed care.
  • Connectivity issues for patient or provider.

How to Schedule a Telehealth Appointment with Your Doctor

Telehealth appointments are generally booked by submitting a request through your provider’s patient portal or calling a medical office directly. Often, you’ll be required to complete some form of screening assessment related to your symptoms to determine whether a telehealth appointment will provide you with the necessary level of care needed for the condition in question. 

What Patients and Providers Say About Telehealth

Although it may seem like telehealth would make medicine feel less personal, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital found that 62% of patients surveyed reported that telehealth visits were as positive as in-person visits, and 21% said they were better than traditional appointments. Clinicians also reported higher efficiency, and more than half agreed that appointments were comparable to those conducted in-person.

Temporary measures were put in place to extend telehealth access to more people during the onset of the COVID-19 crisis, but many medical leaders are pushing for long-term changes. As the healthcare environment continues to adapt, the need for trained medical professionals — both clinical and non-clinical — will only increase. 

Sign up for one of our online courses, offered by Avidity Medical Design Academy, to find out how you can make money in healthcare from home, or contact us today to learn more about how our programs can prepare you to serve in this changing industry. Follow the Avidity Medical Design Blog to stay up to date on the latest trends in healthcare.

5 Unusual Jobs That You Can Pursue in Healthcare

dance-therapist-demonstrating-movement-in-front-of-four-seniors
If you love dance and want to help people, pursuing dance therapy is an excellent choice for you.

Are you thinking of working in the medical field? Is the challenge of going to medical school too daunting? Here are five unique medical jobs where you can help people and earn a good living. 

1. Dance Therapy 

Movement therapy facilitates the mind and body connection and is beneficial in treating a variety of disorders including autism, post-traumatic stress disorders, eating disorders, and Parkinson’s disease. 

If you love dance and want to help people, pursuing dance therapy is an excellent choice for you. The American Dance Therapy Association (ADTA) offers a graduate program in this field. You get to work in a variety of settings including mental health facilities, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, and hospitals. The average salary is about $40,000. You can learn all about this career here

2. Clinical Ethicist

Healthcare workers face ethical dilemmas every day in their practice. If you are in the field of medicine, nursing, law, philosophy, or social science, you can expand your role as a clinical ethicist and provide expertise in this role, too. The salary range is between $40,000 to $150,000 depending on the level of responsibility you take. 

3. Medical Filmmakers and Illustrators 

Bring your technical talent in illustrating or creating film to help teach difficult medical concepts and procedures. As a medical illustrator or animator your salary range is impressive, starting at $62,000 and peaking at $175,000 with a supervisory role. You can freelance this as a side gig as well. 

4. Cardiac Perfusionist 

You might have started out pursuing biology as a pre-med career but decided that you do not want to move forward with it. Consider doing a certification in clinical cardiac perfusion, a job where you assist surgeons during open-heart surgery. You will need to complete 150 hours as a trainee before passing a certification exam offered by the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion. The salary range is between $60,000 to $100,000.

5. Hospital Cleaner 

Your job is fundamental in keeping the hospital clean and infection-free. The hospital can lose major funding as well as its patrons if it is not able to keep up with hygiene and safety standards. The pay range is $30,000 to $40,000, depending on years of experience.

To explore and learn about a wide variety of healthcare topics, please check out our online courses at Avidity Medical Design Academy. The courses are self-paced so you can access them at your own convenience. Visit Avidity Medical Design Academy to learn more about the courses we offer, including:

  1. “How to Prevent Medical Conditions Caused By TOXIC People in Your Life (and Be Healthier!)”
  2. “How to Make Money in Healthcare (Working from Home) (Full Time!)”
  3. “How to Protect Your Own Medical Identity (in 8 EASY Steps!)”
  4. “How to Learn Basic Medical Terminology (in 5 EASY Steps) (and USE IT in EVERYDAY Living!)”
  5. “How to Prevent Disease in Your Body (By Eating Fruits and Vegetables!)” and many more. Visit Avidity Medical Design Academy for more information and a complete listing of courses that are currently available.

Things to Consider When You Are Trying to Choose the Right Healthcare Plan

female-doctor-wearing-blue-scrubs-and-stethoscope-smiling-at-patient-in-the-foreground

You’ve just started a new job, and it’s time to choose a new healthcare plan. Your employer is offering you several plans to choose from. Here are some things to consider when you are trying to choose the right healthcare plan when you are starting a new job.

Start by reviewing the features of each healthcare plan, and then base your decision on a side-by-side comparison of the features of each plan. Then choose the one that best fits your needs. Key factors to consider include deductibles and out-of-pocket costs, whether the plan includes a health savings account, your status as an employee, health insurance networks, your family status, and your age.

Deductibles and Out-of-Pocket Costs

A lot of words are thrown around when choosing and discussing healthcare plans, and it’s important to understand what they mean. A deductible is an amount defined by your insurance provider. It’s how much you pay for your healthcare services before your insurance provider steps in. If your deductible is $1,000, you’ll have to cover $1,000 of your medical expenses, and then you’ll most likely only pay a copay for those covered services and your insurance covers the rest.

Out-of-pocket costs include your deductible, and they also include the cost of all services that aren’t covered. It’s important to analyze the relationship between your new salary and the out-of-pocket costs you may have. Analyze what you’ll be able to afford if you have a medical emergency.

Health Savings Account

A Health Savings Account, or HSA, is a hybrid between a high-deductible health insurance and a tax-favored savings account. Benefits of an HSA include less expensive health insurance, tax-free withdrawals, and tax-deferred interest earnings. Plus, unused money in your HSA isn’t forfeited at the end of the year. It continues to grow! However, you may pay higher out-of-pocket costs at first.

Employee Status

Employees that are higher up on the “corporate chain” may be able to renegotiate presented healthcare plans. If you have a higher-paying or higher-status job, and you aren’t happy with your current options, try discussing other options with your company.

Health Insurance Networks

Some health insurance policies have networks and won’t cover services provided out-of-network. If you’ve got a preferred doctor or specialist you or your family sees, make sure they are in the network of the healthcare plan you’re thinking about. If not, you may want to either switch plans or find a new medical provider.

Family Status and Age

Your family status, and whether you are single, married, and/or a parent, all influence what healthcare plan you might choose. Your personal health also influences your choice. If you frequently visit the emergency room, are expecting or want to be expecting a child, or you have a planned surgery upcoming, you may want a plan that has higher premiums but better coverage. If you’re close to retirement age, you may want to look at insurance plans that benefit retirees.

For more informatoin on healthcare, follow the Avidity Medical Design blog. To enrolls in an online healthcare course, visit Avidity Medical Design Academy.

Two healthcare professionals walking up the stairs and talking

How to Quickly Resolve Conflicts With Coworkers in the Healthcare Environment

Two healthcare professionals walking up the stairs and talking

If you are a student enrolled in a healthcare class or even if you have been practicing in the medical field for some time, you know the benefits and challenges of a healthcare career. You might also consider yourself to be a people person. Despite your best efforts, misunderstandings and conflicts in the workplace are unavoidable.

Since you will be working with these individuals most of the day, if you’re unhappy at work, this can affect your health, both mentally and physically and even emotionally. Here are three things you can do to help you resolve potential conflicts in the healthcare environment and maintain your physical, mental and emotional well being.

1. Be a Good Listener

When conflicts arise, take a moment to stop and breathe. You may not agree with what is being said, but do your best to listen with an open mind and not pass judgment on your coworker for what is being said. Try your best not to interrupt and resist the urge to disagree right away either verbally or non-verbally while your coworker is giving their opinion or expressing their point of view about a conflict in the workplace.

2. Try to Get to Know Them and Appreciate Their Good Qualities

It is very difficult to stay angry with someone who is showing sincere interest in you as a person. Forget about the job and your frustration for a moment. Try to imagine your coworker outside of the work environment and put yourself in his or her shoes. And then try to learn a little bit about them. You could start by asking open-ended questions such as, “How was your weekend?”. You could avoid appearing overly nosy by sharing a little about yourself too. Sharing pictures of your family or pets might also encourage them to open up about themselves. You might be surprised to learn that a coworker who you didn’t get along with has something in common with you in terms of their family background, their interest or their lifestyle in general.

3. The Compliment Sandwich

When you offer criticism, your coworker may shut down or may feel hurt by what you have to say, which won’t help you resolve the problem or avoid the conflict. When offering constructive criticism, if the beneficiary feels hurt at the outset, they may shut down, ending the opportunity for resolution of the problem. Starting off the conversation with sincere words of praise and appreciation for your coworker will make them receptive for the words to follow. Carefully think out what you will say and avoid absolutes when offering criticism such as, “you always” or “you never”. You can finish the dialogue by giving your coworker ideas on what can be done to resolve the problem and assure them of your desire to assist in this process and not forgetting kind words of commendation. If you get to a point where you can’t resolve a conflict with your coworker and you are trying to maintain your professionalism with patients and coworkers alike, in spite of what you may be dealing with in the work environment, consider enrolling in the course entitled,“How to Learn Professionalism in Healthcare”(with REAL-WORLD Examples!) offered by Avidity Medical Design Academy. This course gives you some excellent ideas on how to create and foster a professional atmosphere at work.

Listen to three sample lectures from this course. Click here to take the full course for only $19.99!

Title Slide from “How to Learn Professionalism in Healthcare (with REAL-WORLD Examples!)”
Section 4 from “How to Learn Professionalism in Healthcare (with REAL-WORLD Examples!)”
Rule #1 (Be Sincere) from “How to Learn Professionalism in Healthcare (with REAL-WORLD Examples!)”

If you’re interested in learning more about other healthcare topics such as basic medical terminology or how to make money in healthcare from home, please check out our website for courses that we currently offer. To find out more about courses that Avidity Medical Design offers and for other tips related to working in the healthcare field, please check out our blog

Why You Might Want to Think About Holistic Medicine

massage therapist using roller tool on female client's back in gently-lit room with grey curtains

In the world today, the list of what ails us only seems to be growing. While science and medicine do their best to keep up, we would all do well to learn what our options are in order to better understand how to prevent and recover from disease quickly and easily. One option is holistic medicine, a growing field that many people find intriguing.

What Is Holistic Medicine

Holistic medicine is an approach to medicine that looks at the whole person in order to improve a patient’s health and help each patient live a more vibrant happier life. It begins with an understanding that there should be a flow of life energy throughout the three parts that make up a person. The three parts that make up a person, according to holistic medicine are: the spirit, mind, and body. All three of these parts are interconnected. Because these three parts are interconnected, they must all be considered when working toward wellness. While a traditional medical approach may treat the problem with a medication or surgery, holistic medicine incorporates education on lifestyle changes, self-care, and emotional well-being, in addition to any necessary medication or surgery.

This type of care keeps the focus on the patient as a whole person, instead of looking mainly at the patient’s health problem. According to the American Holistic Health Association, “Optimal health is much more than the absence of sickness. It is the conscious pursuit of the highest qualities of the physical, environmental, mental, emotional, spiritual, and social aspects of the human experience.” 

Female doctor and senior woman patient talking in doctor’s office.

When You Might Want to Consider Holistic Medicine 

There are many reasons you might want to consider holistic medicine. Maybe traditional treatment is not working as well as you’d hoped, or maybe traditional treatment comes with dangerous risks and side effects. This is a good time to consult with your doctor about adding a “whole-person approach” to the medical regimen that your doctor prescribes, to help you start learning how to help heal your body from within. At times, traditional medicine is expensive or even totally unavailable. Holistic options offer a simpler approach with options that patients can often utilize at home. Lastly, some patients find the traditional approach to be invasive and intimidating. In general, a holistic medicine route is more gentle and comfortable for the patient. As a patient, you may feel cared for in a way that helps to elevate your overall quality of life, not just your health, and this level of empowerment may help you take healthy steps for the future that can benefit your peace of mind and well being as a whole. 

Why You Might Want to Consider a Career in Holistic Medicine

If you’re interested in pursuing a career in holistic medicine, the options are plentiful, and it is certainly a growing field. You can earn your practitioner certification in yoga instructing and massage therapy, for example, in under a year. If you want to become a more advanced practitioner, such as a chiropractor, you can earn your doctor of chiropractic degree after completing post-secondary education and more extensive training. This means greater income potential as a practitioner of holistic medicine. Holistic medicine careers are growing fast. Careers in massage therapy are growing much faster than average with a median income of $41,420 a year and a growth projection of 22% between 2018-2028, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is likely due to more and more insurance plans allowing for a massage to be covered as the health benefits become clearer. With a short path to become certified, a career in holistic medicine is worth considering.

You can find more articles about healthcare on the Avidity Medical Design blog. Follow our blog to stay up to date on different healthcare careers, and to learn about the many different online healthcare classes offered by Avidity Medical Design Academy, such as “How to Prevent Disease in Your Body (By Eating Fruits and Vegetables!)” New articles and new courses are coming soon, so check back often! 

woman wearing grey volunteer shirt smiling while holding stethoscope and talking to person in yellow shirt

Volunteer Work That You Can Do to Gain Experience in Healthcare Without a Diploma or GED

In the previous article, you learned about 10 careers in healthcare that you can pursue without a high school diploma or GED. Once you complete training for a healthcare career without a diploma or GED, you need to be able to sell yourself with some experience. This article provides specific steps that you can take to volunteer to gain experience in healthcare without a high school diploma or GED. Employers are more apt to hire people with experience, and volunteer work is a guaranteed way to get it. 

woman wearing grey volunteer shirt smiling while holding stethoscope and talking to person in yellow shirt

1. How to Volunteer as a Home Health Aide

Most home health or hospice organizations gladly accept volunteers in order to meet the needs of their patients. . 

2. How to Volunteer as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)

Check out local nursing homes and find out if they’ll accept volunteers. Often, they are more than happy to have more helping hands. This could be an opportunity to get hired in a paid CNA position later. 

3. How to Volunteer as a Phlebotomist

The American Red Cross is an excellent choice for those wanting volunteer work with phlebotomist training. Get involved in their blood drives and gain valuable experience you’ll use in your future career and on your resume. 

4. How to Volunteer as a Massage Therapist

Once you are trained, volunteering your massage therapy services is welcome at some community events, sports activities, and medical facilities. Not only will you get experience, but you can start building a reputation. 

5. How to Volunteer as a Medical Secretary

Because a medical secretary is often required to perform clerical or front desk tasks, volunteering at any type of community event shows an ability to organize. It also shows your interest in participating in community betterment. Talk with your local chamber of commerce or set up a team for a fundraiser such as Relay for Life. Your volunteer work acts like employment history when it comes to getting hired. 

6. How to Volunteer as a Dental Assistant

The volunteer opportunities for dental assisting are exciting. Dental assistants are always needed on international dental missions, and your dental care for people in developing countries will almost guarantee employment afterward. 

7. How to Volunteer as a Medical Coder

There is a lot of competition for medical coding jobs, and one way to up your chances of hire is to volunteer at the place where you want to work. Check out hospital websites for volunteer opportunities, and make your name recognizable so that your resume isn’t passed over. 

8. How to Volunteer as an Ophthalmic Medical Assistant

Volunteering for an ophthalmic mission may not be a possibility for the inexperienced ophthalmic medical assistant, but volunteering with the Lions Club certainly is an option. Volunteer for school vision screenings and show your interest in the world of vision. 

9. How to Volunteer as a Medical Transcriptionist

There aren’t really volunteer transcription activities because it is a solo profession, but any volunteer activities in the medical field will show that you have an understanding of how the field of medicine works, which will improve the quality of your transcription. Pay attention to local calls for volunteers. You will likely end up volunteering at fundraisers or healthcare facilities, but you’ll be gaining a working knowledge of the medical content that you will transcribe. 

10. How to Volunteer as an Occupational Therapy Aide

Occupational therapy is required for many people with disabilities, so it stands to reason that volunteering for a disability-related organization would be beneficial for employment prospects. Volunteer ideas include the Special Olympics and The Wounded Warrior Project, and they show your compassion for helping people live normal lives. 

Volunteering gives potential employers a way to overlook your lack of high school diploma or GED. It shows that you have a true interest in your field and that you’ll be an asset to their organization. 

For more informative healthcare articles, visit the Avidity Medical Design Blog.

10 Healthcare Careers You Can Pursue Without a High School Diploma or GED

If you haven’t finished getting your high school diploma or your GED (General Education Diploma), it is difficult to know where to turn for potential employment in healthcare careers. However, the healthcare field has multiple promising career options that don’t always require a diploma to get on-the-job or other training. Check your state’s requirements, and consider the following job opportunities to get your foot in the door of the healthcare field.  

woman using machine to take blood pressure of seated woman indoors

If you are interested in pursuing a career in healthcare, but you don’t have a high school diploma or your GED, then consider becoming:

1. A Home Health Aide

  • Description: Home health aides work in people’s homes or care facilities and help them with daily tasks. 
  • TrainingTraining requirements vary depending on the facility and may require certification, which typically takes 75 hours of training. 
  • Job Outlook and Salary: The job outlook in this career is also very promising at 36%. In 2018, the median pay for this career was $24,060/year. 

2. A Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)

  • Description: A CNA gives basic medical services to patients in nursing homes and hospitals. This may involve helping to lift and move patients with mobility problems. Nursing assistants often help patients who have difficulty with everyday tasks such as bathing or eating. 
  • Training: Generally, a CNA program takes 4 to 12 weeks. 
  • Job Outlook and SalaryThe outlook for this career is looking strong with 9% growth expected over the next decade. In 2018, the median pay for this career was $28,530/year. 

3. A Phlebotomist 

  • Description: A phlebotomist is a person who draws blood for multiple reasons in the healthcare field. They work in a variety of settings, including blood banks or research facilities.   
  • Training: A non-degree certification takes 4 to 8 months.  
  • Job Outlook and Salary: The outlook for this career is expected to expand faster than many other job opportunities at 23% over the next decade. In 2018, the median pay for this career was $34,480/year. 

4. A Massage Therapist

  • Description: Massage therapists massage muscles and soft tissue in order to relieve soreness or provide relaxation. 
  • TrainingTraining for massage therapy varies from just over 300 hours to about 1,000 hours depending on the program. 
  • Job Outlook and SalaryThe outlook for this occupation is 22% over the next decade. The median pay for this career in 2018 was $41,420/year. 
Cropped image of It specialist working on code

5. A Medical Secretary

  • Description: Medical secretaries handle the functioning of medical facilities from a paperwork and communication standpoint. They may be responsible for handling phones, insurance information, and front desk duties. 
  • Training: There is not always required training, but medical secretary programs generally take 1 to 2 years of formal and on-the-job training. 
  • Job Outlook and Salary: The outlook is weak for secretaries in general with a decline of 7% expected in the next decade. The median pay for this career in 2018 was $38,880/year. 

6. A Dental Assistant

  • DescriptionDental assistants perform a number of tasks in the dental office, which may include taking x-rays, providing care, and clerical tasks. 
  • TrainingOn the job training is the only requirement in some states, but formal dental assisting programs take 1 to 2 years. 
  • Job Outlook and Salary: The job outlook in this career is not bad at 11% predicted over the next decade, and the median pay for dental assistants in 2018 was $38,660/year. 

7. A Medical Coder

  • DescriptionMedical coders learn how to use diagnostic and procedural codes to quantify patient diagnoses and services rendered for billing and other purposes. 
  • TrainingCoding programs typically last a few months to 2 years.
  • Job Outlook and SalaryThe job outlook in this career is 11% over the next decade, and the 2018 median pay for this category of employment was $40,350/year. 

8. An Ophthalmic Medical Assistant

  • DescriptionOphthalmic medical assistants take patient histories and administer ophthalmic testing during exams. They also assist the optometrist or ophthalmologist in a variety of clinical tasks. 
  • TrainingCertificates are available to further one’s career, but on-the-job training is typically sufficient for employment. 
  • Job Outlook and SalarySimilar to medical assistants, the job outlook for this field of work is good at 23%, and median pay in 2018 was $33,610/year. 

9. A Medical Transcriptionist

  • DescriptionMedical transcriptionists listen to recorded documentation of patient encounters and convert them to a readable format via keyboarding/typing skills. 
  • TrainingTraining varies but typically includes medical terminology and electronic health record training. 
  • Job Outlook and SalaryDue to technology and voice recognition, the outlook for this career is not great and is expected to decrease by 3% over the next decade. The median pay  for transcriptionists in 2018 was $34,770/year. 

10. An Occupational Therapy Aide

  • DescriptionOccupational therapy aides help people recover and improve normal living and working skills that have diminished as a result of accident or health condition. They do not typically get involved in hands-on care, but rather provide supportive services to occupational therapists and assistants. 
  • TrainingTraining varies based on state and position and may require only on-the-job training. 
  • Job Outlook and SalaryThe Bureau of Labor and Statistics groups Occupational Therapy Assistants and Aides together, and they report the outlook of both positions look good, predicting a 31% increase over the next decade. The median pay for aides was $28,160 in 2018. 

There are other healthcare careers available that may not require a high school degree or GED equivalent. Many healthcare employers will state on their job requirements that you need a high school diploma or GED equivalent. Don’t let this discourage you. Look up your state’s requirements for the position for which you are applying, and let the employer know that you are the right person for the job. 

If you would like to work from home in the field of healthcare, enroll in the course entitled, “How to Make Money in Healthcare Working from Home (Full Time!)” offered by Avidity Medical Design Academy.

Listen to three sample lectures from this course below. Click here to take the full course for only $49.99!

Title Slide from “How to Make Money in Healthcare Working from Home (Full Time!)”
Lecture 12 from “How to Make Money in Healthcare Working from Home (Full Time!)”
Lecture 13 from “How to Make Money in Healthcare Working from Home (Full Time!)”

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