new healthcare job with doctors speaking in hallway

5 Ways to Be Successful on Your First Day on the Job as a Healthcare Professional

new healthcare job with doctors speaking in hallway

The first day on a job is stressful. You want to present yourself as responsible and enthusiastic. Here are five tips so you can make the best impression possible in your new healthcare position. 

Be Punctual

Arriving late on your first day gives the wrong first impression. You want to start out on the right foot, and you want your immediate supervisor, as well as her manager, to know they made the right decision by hiring you, rather than another candidate with similar qualifications. So, give yourself some extra time when you start your commute. It is better to arrive too early than too late; if you arrive too early, you can always stop and grab a cup of coffee or pick up a breakfast sandwich if you need to kill some extra time. You will feel a lot calmer if you can start your day without feeling rushed. It is also a good idea to stay a little bit later if it looks like you are needed. There will be a lot to absorb and staying late shows you are a team player. 

Act Professionally

Dress for the part. People expect professional dress in the healthcare environment. Additionally, it is important to interact with people in a professional manner. You want to look people in the eye, smile, give a firm handshake, and employ active listening. Refrain from joking around until you know people better. For more thorough recommendations, enroll in our course entitled, “How to Learn Professionalism in Healthcare (with REAL-WORLD Examples).”

Ask Questions

Don’t put too much pressure on yourself. You won’t learn everything the first day. There’s a lot to learn, in terms of the processes and procedures that you need to follow to do the job effectively, so go easy on yourself. Ask as many questions as you can think of, and keep a notepad nearby to write down the answers, so you don’t have to ask the same question twice after you receive the answer to your question the first time. You don’t want to pester your supervisor with questions but you do need to know what you are supposed to do. In addition, asking questions shows you are interested in learning the job. If you don’t have a notepad nearby, open your phone and add a note as a memo to yourself. When you compile a list of the questions that you asked, and the answers you received (and the person that gave you the answer in case there are any contradictions in the answers you receive), make a copy of your questions and answers and keep them all in a safe place.

Take A Break 

You will have an opportunity for a break at some point in the day. Although it may be tempting to skip the break (or skip lunch) in order to make yourself look committed, take the break and take lunch. Your first day on the job can be stressful and overwhelming, especially when you are working in the healthcare environment, and especially if your new job involves dealing directly with patients, nurses, physicians, and upper-level management. Use your break to regroup and relieve some stress. Taking a short walk and some deep breaths are always a good idea. If co-workers ask you to go to lunch take advantage of the invitation. It is an opportunity to get to know people better and gain more information about the job you’ll be doing, other people that you will be working with, either directly or indirectly, the environment that you’ll be working in, and some things you can do get up to speed quickly with the job you’ll be doing.

Expect The Unexpected

You never know what the first day might look like. Hospitals, clinics, and doctor’s offices are often busy environments where everything does not go as planned. Do whatever your supervisor asks and be prepared to “go with the flow”. Sometimes a job is slightly different than the job description.

The first day in a healthcare setting sets the stage for your work experience. Your attitude and preparedness go a long way toward achieving a favorable outcome. If you want to thrive in the world of healthcare, visit the Avidity Medical Design Blog to read more articles to help you succeed the first day on your new job in healthcare.

woman in job interview

How to Do Well at a Healthcare Job Interview

woman in job interview

Whether you’re fresh out of school, beginning a career change, or just looking for a new job in healthcare, you need to be prepared to do well at your interviews. You may already know the basics of a good interview, but there are some additional tips that can help you when you interview specifically for a job in healthcare.

Showcase Relevant Experience

Relevant experience doesn’t have to be limited to experience in healthcare itself. Healthcare jobs are highly specialized, and you may not have as much experience in the exact position you’re applying for, but you may still have experience in other areas that may qualify you for a position in healthcare – experience that you can still use during the initial stages of the interview. To be successful in healthcare, you must have good experience with interpersonal communication, for example, so be sure to emphasize the steps you took to acquire this experience, and how you can use this experience in the healthcare position that you are applying for. Maybe you handled difficult customers with grace and patience as a customer service representative, or maybe you found different ways to connect with people as a telemarketer. Attention to detail is another element of previous experience that you can transfer over from many different types of work. Don’t be shy about discussing your past experience in other fields as long as you can connect it directly to the healthcare position that you are interviewing for.

Be Specific

Your interviewer is looking for the best fit for a particular healthcare position. When you showcase your relevant experience, and you discuss your previous skills, be as specific as possible. When discussing a previous internship or a previous job, remember to talk about specific situations where you demonstrated skills that apply to the job in healthcare that you are interviewing for, and how you developed those skills. Did you help implement a new filing system as an intern? Did you discover a recordkeeping error at a retail job? Did your supervisors consistently mention your people skills or your attention to detail? These are great points to bring up, and will help an interviewer determine how well your skills align with the job that you are applying for in healthcare.

Don’t Forget the Basics

While interviewing in the healthcare field has its own challenges, the basic rules of interview etiquette still apply. Professionalism is key. Dress well, make good eye contact, and most of all, be on time. A day or so after the interview, follow up with a well-written “thank you” note and send it to the person who interviewed you. A note like this is not only polite, but it also keeps you fresh in the interviewer’s mind, especially when they have scheduled interviews with multiple candidates for the same position. In your note, be specific about your interview experience, and include your thoughts about the interviewer and what you learned about the position that you interviewed for. Remember that the note should read like a “thank you” note and not like a cover letter for the interview.

Visit the Avidity Medical Design blog to learn more about healthcare, as well as healthcare courses offered by Avidity Medical Design Academy. The key is to get as much information as possible to help you prepare for the interview and to help you prepare for a future career in healthcare.

5 Ways to Market Yourself as a Virtual Medical Assistant

female virtual medical assistant using laptop computer

Whether you’re just beginning your journey as a virtual medical assistant or you’ve been working as a medical assistant for awhile, you may be interested in learning new ways to market yourself as a professional in the medical industry. Here are a few basic tools you can use to market yourself effectively as a virtual medical assistant.

Network

Meeting people in person and online are two of the best ways to get the word out about your skills as a virtual medical assistant. While you may be great at what you do, no one will know that if you do not tell them. Make sure the people in your circle know that you are actively looking for more clients.

Create a Compelling Email Signature

Anytime you send an email to anyone, make sure your email signature has a catchy tagline and other information that quickly highlights your expertise. If you have a link to your own virtual medical assistant website or social media platform, include that in your signature line as well. The easier you are to find, the more business you’re likely to earn.

Use Social Media

Facebook has a tool that allows you to run your own ad campaign. It’s very simple to do and can give your virtual medical assistant career a boost. You need to do your research to make sure you’re targeting the right audience, but once you have a few successful ads, your business could really become successful.

Start a Blog

It may not seem like a good way to earn business, but starting a blog about your experiences working as a virtual medical assistant is another tool you can use to spread the word about your business. You can even create a contact page so that potential clients know how to reach you should they ever have a need for your services.

Visit Medical Facilities

It may seem like a lot of legwork, but what better way is there to let medical personnel know that you’re looking for work than to walk right into their office and tell them? You can provide a brief explanation of how your services can benefit them, and leave a business card for the office manager. Even if an office already has all the staff they need, they may know someone who could really use your help.

For more information on how to take your career to the next level, visit the Avidity Medical Design blog today or enroll in the course entitled, “How to Use Social Media in Healthcare (with REAL-WORLD Examples!)” offered by Avidity Medical Design Academy

female doctor speaking to female patient in doctor's office

10 *More* Reasons Why You Should Be Your Own Advocate in the Doctor’s Office (Part II)

female doctor speaking to female patient in doctor's office

While your mom may be there to hold your hand at the doctor’s office well into adulthood (AND THERE’S NO SHAME IN THAT!), you are your own best advocate when you sit down to have a talk with your doc. 

1. You know your body.

Only you know if your heart flutters after exercise or if you have digestion problems. Another person cannot possibly know every ache and pain, and those details may be important to a diagnosis. The tiniest detail, provided by you, may narrow down a diagnosis and prevent even bigger problems. 

2. You need to be informed. 

Once you sit down with your doctor, you need to understand what they are telling you. If they bring up a body part or treatment option you don’t understand, you must ask what it means. Don’t rely on others to translate. You need to hear it directly from your doctor. 

3. You know your history. 

If you are an established patient, your physician may have a fairly accurate history. However, you may not have told them an important part of your surgical history or family history unless something makes you recall it. You have to be the person that communicates (if able) because only you know the intricate details your life. 

4. You have a choice.

Patient-centered care is all about choice, and you have the right to understand and approve any procedures. You cannot do this without being informed and active in your medical care. This is not to say don’t listen to your doctor, but if you don’t feel comfortable, there is nothing wrong with getting a second opinion. 

5. You chose your lifestyle. 

If you do not advocate for yourself, then you probably won’t make healthy decisions. Why get your blood pressure checked if you aren’t going to do anything if it is too high? Being your own advocate gets you involved in the process, and it forces you to take charge of your situation. 

6. You need to focus on prevention or treatment. 

Focusing on what to do next is nearly impossible if you aren’t your own advocate. If you aren’t involved in the medical process, you will not be able to adequately focus on prevention or treatment. This could be as minimal as neglecting to take a multivitamin or as crucial as taking too many beta-blockers, which could be deadly. 

7. You need to take control. 

Especially if you find a medical problem, life can seem hopeless if you aren’t your own advocate. You may feel completely out of control of your destiny. Being your own advocate empowers you to take control of the situation and focus on recovery. 

8. You can only depend on yourself. 

Sure, you may have a very dependable friend or family member, but you can only depend on yourself when it comes to your healthcare. Having someone with you is not a bad idea if you are comfortable and have the right sort of person, but don’t let that let you become complacent. Remember: This is about you, and you need to depend on yourself. 

9. You know what you want. 

One of the most important reasons to be your own advocate in your healthcare is that you are the only person who truly knows what you want. If you want to lower your cholesterol, listen to your doctor. If you want to lose weight, your doctor will have good resources. You have to choose what you want out of the appointment, and nobody else can do that for you. 

10. You want your appointment to be complete. 

Lastly, you want your appointment to completely alleviate any concerns. Don’t go home wishing you had asked your doctor an embarrassing question. Trust me, they’ve heard worse. Write down your questions, and have the courage to ask them. As your own advocate, you will feel satisfied when leaving the doctor’s office knowing that you covered everything.

To learn more about different healthcare topics that can help you take charge of your own healthcare, visit the Avidity Medical Design blog.

6 Ways to Be Your Own Advocate in the Doctor’s Office (Part I)

woman speaking with doctor in doctor's office

A visit to your doctor’s office can produce a wide range of emotions, such as dread, anxiety, fear, or even embarrassment. Approach your next doctor’s appointment a little differently by thinking of yourself as an advocate for your own healthcare.

Do Your Research

The first step in advocating for your own healthcare is research! If you’re looking for a doctor, research doctors online, and read reviews about each office. Don’t overlook this important step! Read the reviews for each office to understand the experiences of other patients who have chosen a particular doctor. Consider what others have to say about the doctor or the office when making your decision. Research the types of treatment available to you so that you’re able to make an informed decision. If you’ve already chosen a particular doctor, think about your symptoms or the purpose of your visit. Your doctor is a professional, but the amount of information available on the Internet means that you can be well-informed before you schedule an appointment with your doctor. Bring information on symptoms you have, or treatments you’re interested in receiving, so that your doctor can review the best options with you. In short: Take an active role in partnering with your doctor to make decisions about your own medical treatment.

Request Your Medical Records

As a part of educating yourself on your own health, request your own medical records, and learn what is in your medical files. Not only does this help you educate yourself on your medical needs, it also helps you quickly provide information to your providers, who may or may not collaborate with one another to provide the best care for you. Deciphering medical information is not always easy, so click here to learn how to read your own medical file.

Keep a Log

Whether you are managing your weight, blood pressure, sugar levels, mood, sleep, or something else entirely, keeping a log between doctor’s visits can be a valuable tool when making treatment decisions. On the spot, you may not always remember things accurately, or you might over- or under-report information based on how you’re feeling on a particular day, or you might doubt yourself when asked follow-up questions. Arming yourself with a list of blood pressure readings or the hours you’re sleeping at night, provides concrete information to support your concerns, and gives you a way to track any healthcare changes that might occur. 

Write Your Questions Down

Along with doing the research, write down questions that you have as you think of them. Keep a running note on your cell phone so you can add to it whenever something comes to mind. Keeping a note in your phone means that you’re less likely to forget to bring it with you to your next doctor’s appointment!

Arrive Early

Many medical offices won’t see you if you arrive late for your appointment. Even if you are seen, you or your doctor may feel rushed, and you may not be able to discuss everything you want to talk about. If you’re serious about your health, and you’ve put in the work to prepare for the visit to your doctor, leave a few minutes early to make sure you get to the office on time. You won’t regret it.

Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst

Hopefully, your doctor is thrilled by the information that you’ve collected, and the information that you’ve brought in, and partners with you to address your healthcare concerns. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case. Prepare what you would like to say in the event you feel as though you need to say more. Start small, like telling your doctor you don’t feel like your questions were answered, or that your concerns were fully addressed. In the event you’re still not satisfied, would you like to schedule an immediate follow-up appointment? Would you rather speak with a physician’s assistant or a nurse, who may have more time to spend with you? Would you like to request a referral to a specialist, or a referral to another medical professional for a second opinion? 

Ultimately, you are your biggest advocate when it comes to your health. Stay informed! For more information on healthcare topics that can help you become the best advocate you can possibly be for your own health, or the health of your family and friends, visit The Avidity Medical Design Blog.

How to Write a Great Resume if You Are New to Healthcare

woman holding resume with tablet in background
job search on online internet. applying for a job concept.

Writing a resume is an important part of the job search process. Your resume is your potential employer’s first chance to get to know you and to see whether you would be a good fit for their company. Many times, recruiters won’t spend more than a few minutes scanning over your resume, so it is important to make a good first impression. If you are new to the healthcare field, you are already at a disadvantage in relation to those who have previous experience, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be competitive. So what can do to make sure your resume stands out in the crowd?

Highlight Your Education

Often, your educational background is just as important as your work history. If you have a degree, make sure it is prominently listed on your resume. If your degree is in the healthcare field be sure to highlight it on your resume. If you don’t have a degree or your degree is in a field outside of healthcare, still list your degree because it highlights your versatility and makes you stand out from other candidates. Even though you may not get the position that you initially applied for, it increases the likelihood that you might be considered for other positions in the broader field of health information management, positions that may not yet have been posted on a job website or advertised in a newspaper.

If you have a degree in journalism, English, or instructional design, for example, you might be hired to design courses to train new healthcare employees or write job aids as continuing education tools for employees and contractors who are already working in the field. Don’t forget to include science classes, math classes, computer applications, and medical terminology classes as well. Remember that you can transfer what you learn in these types of classes, and you can transfer the skills that you acquire from using different types of computer applications to your new career in healthcare. Don’t worry if you have no previous schooling. There are many healthcare classes that you can take to enhance your resume, and increase the likelihood that you will stand out as a viable candidate when you apply for a position in healthcare. Avidity Medical Design Academy offers classes like medical terminology and medical coding that can be quickly and easily taken from the comfort of your home.

Showcase Your Skills

Your skills and experience are what make you a valuable employee. Highlight all of your skills throughout your resume, even skills that may not be directly related to the healthcare position that you are applying for, such as customer service, which shows you have good people skills, and shows that you can resolve potential communication conflicts in the healthcare setting. If you are an expert in certain computer applications, say so. If you were on a special committee, talk about what you did on the committee. Choose a layout for your resume that puts your skills, education, and experience in the best light, and helps you put your best foot forward. If you don’t have direct experience in healthcare, create a functional resume instead. A functional resume focuses on your skills and experience, rather than on your work history. Regardless of the type of resume that you choose, remember to list your skills in all sections of your resume, including your work history, educational background, and other sections of your resume.

Tip: Did you know that many large companies use a computer application to automatically scan resumes for certain keywords? This means if your resume is missing those keywords, it may not even be seen by human eyes. Scan each job listing that you apply for and find ways to include terms from the job listing on your resume. If you have dreamed about moving into the healthcare industry and working from home, now is the time. Visit Avidity Medical Design Academy to view our courses and see how we can help you find your dream job.

Ditch the Office Job — Work at Home in Healthcare

woman working on computer in home office

Are you a parent wanting to spend more time at home with your children? Do you have health problems that make keeping a typical 9-to-5 office job difficult? Or maybe you are tired of making that long commute to work every day or you’re sick of the office politics. There are many reasons why you might not want to work in a traditional office setting. Thankfully, now more than ever, there are a growing number of work-from-home options available. 

The healthcare industry provides many opportunities if you are interested in transitioning to your home office. But the field is very competitive. So how do you prepare yourself and become a standout candidate?

Emphasize Your Skills

Whether you are a stay-at-home parent or you are looking for a career change, you probably have more transferable skills than you realize. Think about the jobs you have done in the past. If you worked in an office setting you probably have extensive experience with computers, phones, and customer service. Maybe you were trained in SharePoint file management, computer database systems, or different word processing programs. These are valuable skills you can add to your resume. 

Don’t undervalue your skills if you are a stay-at-home parent. Think about your hobbies, volunteer positions, and any classes you may have taken. Were you the president of the PTA? You likely have experience fundraising, creating emails, and managing others. Did you supplement the family’s income with freelance writing? There are many writing positions in the healthcare field. It’s important that you emphasize all the skills you bring to the table, both on your resume and during your interview. 

Take a Class

You don’t have to get a degree to get a job in healthcare, but taking a class can help boost your skills, your resume, and your confidence. Avidity Medical Design Academy offers many classes, designed for people just like you. Our How to Make Money in Healthcare Working from Home (Full Time!) course is a great place to start. This course will teach you about 10 different healthcare careers that allow you to work from home full time, including jobs that offer full benefits, such as 401k, life insurance, and medical, dental, and vision benefits. You will learn about each career as well as the required skills, training, professional licenses, and certifications, how you make money, and how to get started right away, as soon as you finish the course. With each of the careers, you also get a real-world example, so that you can see what your typical day will be like if you chose to work from home in a particular area of healthcare. At the end of the course, you will be ready to take the steps you need to take in order to enter the world of healthcare. We also offer other courses to help you succeed, including medical coding and medical terminology. 

Visit Avidity Medical Design Academy to view our course offerings and find out more about how you can work from home in the healthcare industry. 

How to Work From Home in the Healthcare Industry

woman working in home office on computer

More managers than ever are offering employees the option of working from home. Whether it’s staying out of rush-hour traffic, being closer to your loved ones, or improving your work-life balance, there’s never been a better time to telecommute.

In this post, we’ll look at the steps you can take to work from home in the healthcare industry.  

Target the Right Industry

Before you start your search, make sure you have the right training in the right field. Not every industry is telecommute-friendly. Some industries allow you to work remotely, but in lower-paying positions with less specialized skills or required knowledge.

The healthcare industry represents the best of both worlds. The field of healthcare offers a variety of positions that require more specialized skills, and a greater degree of knowledge, in return for relatively high compensation, benefits, and schedule flexibility. 

Optimize Your Home Office (and Internet)

The key to working from home is treating your telecommuting position with the same level of responsibility that you would if you were working in the office. This means signing on to work at your scheduled start time, and adhering to your required schedule from your home office. The key to effective telecommuting also means responding to emails and instant messaging in a timely manner, and adhering to quality and productivity guidelines for the work that you are doing. While working from home can support a variety of workspaces and setups, two components you’ll need to have are a computer and a reliable Internet connection. You can only benefit from the flexibility of working from home if you have the tools necessary to communicate and complete each task on schedule.

Identify Your Options

The most common starting points when looking for remote positions are employment sites and job boards, using keywords such as “telecommute,” “remote,” and “work from home” in addition to the specific job you are interested in applying for, or the field of healthcare that you would like to explore. Some job boards offer only telecommuting positions, but they may be flooded with a large number of applicants. 

If you’re interested in working from home in the healthcare industry, we can help. Invest in yourself and improving your work-life balance by enrolling in our course entitled, “How to Make Money Working From Home in Healthcare (Full Time!).” Enroll now and get the course for the limited time offer of 50% off.

For more informative articles, visit the Avidity Medical Design Blog.

A female pharmacist sits with a senior female patient in the pharmacist consultation area and discusses her prescription and choice of medication. In the background a father and daughter stand at the dispensing counter and are served by a female pharmacy assistant .

Seeking a Healthcare Career? 7 Steps to Creating a Professional Demeanor That Keeps You on the Job

In the healthcare industry, maintaining a professional demeanor is critical. Not only do you want to be sure that you’ll be recognized for the time and effort you’ve put into your studies, you want to be sure that patients have a sense of confidence in you. You’re responsible for dealing with sensitive and private information, providing advice and treatment, and reassuring patients. With a calm, professional demeanor, you’ll be better able to control your patient interactions and put yourself in a better position to increase patient confidence. 

A female pharmacist sits with a senior female patient in the pharmacist consultation area and discusses her prescription and choice of medication. In the background a father and daughter stand at the dispensing counter and are served by a female pharmacy assistant .

Step One: Be Positive

No, you don’t need to go skipping down the halls, singing about all the wonderful opportunities that are open to you. Rather, you should maintain a positive attitude whenever you interact with your patients or coworkers. An attitude of doom and gloom or constant complaints–especially complaints relating to your job or coworkers–can quickly destroy patient confidence and convince them that they can’t trust you to adequately handle their case, which can, over time, erode your odds of promotion or even destroy your career. Instead, try to be upbeat. Remember why you chose to do what you do and why you enjoy it. When a coworker, from a nurse to a doctor, asks you to accomplish a task, do it cheerfully and calmly. This simple step inspires a great deal more confidence in your patients than seeing you come in complaining before you’ve even had a chance to get to know them. A dose of positive can go a long way toward improving your professional appearance. 

Step Two: Avoid Drama

“You know, we were just back in the nurse’s station talking about Deborah’s husband and…” “I don’t want to cause trouble, but you’ve dealt with Dr. Brown, and I haven’t been impressed with his diagnoses in the past.” Whether you’re talking directly to a patient or chatting at the nurse’s station, one of the fastest ways to decrease patient confidence and drop that professional demeanor is to get involved in drama. Your personal life doesn’t belong at work, especially when you’re dealing with patients. Instead, keep it professional while you’re on the clock! Avoid conflict with coworkers, and try not to get sucked into drama–even if a patient is the one to initiate the complaint. 

Step Three: Get Organized

There’s something reassuring about a medical professional who walks into a room and already knows exactly where everything is. Whether it’s a routine exam or an emergency, they don’t have to scramble for the proper materials; rather, they’re able to easily access exactly what they need. In many medical settings, it can be hard to keep up with simple organization tasks, but it’s a step that’s well worth it! Create a system that works for you, whether you’re pushing medical carts down the halls of a hospital or organizing an exam room in an office. Organize your personal supplies so that you know exactly where everything is. This can create a big difference in the way you appear to both patients and colleagues. 

Step Four: Listen

One of the most effective ways to create an aura of professionalism is to simply listen to those around you–both other workers and patients. As a doctor, for example, if a nurse tells you something, there’s a good chance that it’s important, whether they’ve observed odd patient behavior or noted a symptom you need to pay attention to. It also pays to listen to patients. Sometimes, they’re babbling just to talk or to calm their nerves, but other times, they may have something to say that genuinely relates to their care. Simply listening to them and giving genuine, considered responses can help increase their confidence in you and put you in a better position to provide high-quality care. 

Step Five: Be Honest

A little girl is at the doctors office for a check up. A nurse is sitting with them and talking to the mother.

It’s often tempting to blur the truth a little in a work environment, especially when you’re dealing with difficult patients. “Of course I remembered to tell the patient X.” “It wasn’t my turn to complete X task.” If you want to create a more professional attitude, however, be honest–both with your colleagues and with your patients. Own up to your mistakes and do what’s necessary to make it right. If things are way behind in the office, don’t tell patients that they’ll be seen in just a few minutes–give them an accurate assessment of what your schedule looks like, then offer them the ability to choose for themselves how they want to handle it. Honesty truly is the best policy–and it creates a more professional demeanor and appearance for your entire office. 

Step Six: Check the Small Stuff

As a medical professional, you know that there’s really no “small stuff” when it comes to dealing with patients. Inevitably, it’s the test you forgot to run or the gauge you forgot to check that turns out to be the most important to your patient. If you want to maintain a more professional demeanor, take the time to check the small stuff. Not only does this increase your quality of patient care, it shows your patients that you genuinely care about them and are willing to work hard to get to the bottom of whatever problem they’re having. 

Step Seven: Check Your Appearance

As nice as it would be if appearances didn’t matter, your appearance can go a long way toward establishing your professionalism in the eyes of your patients and your colleagues. Do a quick appearance check each day to make sure that you look as professional as possible. Check your scrubs to be sure that they’re clean and unstained. If they’re starting to look too worn, it may be time for a replacement. Keep your hair up and away from your face. For women, makeup should be professional and clean, rather than obvious or overdone. Take a quick look in the mirror: do you look like a medical professional that you’d want to treat you? If not, clean up your appearance for the benefit of everyone around you.

Taking the leap to become more professional can go a long way toward advancing your medical career and improving the confidence that patients have in you. With these seven steps, you can transform your demeanor so that patients will be able to more easily see just how capable you are. Want more information? Check out our course entitled, “How to Learn Professionalism in Healthcare (with Real-World Examples!),” which offers strategies to increase your professionalism and give you a winning attitude for success!