Tag: healthcare workplace

More Tips: A 4-Step Guide to Professional Dress in the Medical Office

While proper attire is important in any office, professional dress in the medical office is crucial. Maintaining a professional appearance is the key to patient comfort and trust. Below is a 4-step guide to help navigate the pitfalls of dressing for the medical office.

Professional Dress in the Medical OfficeFirst off, medical office personnel deal with patients at a very personal level. They have contact with the patient physically and they have general access to highly sensitive information such as health history and social security numbers. By presenting themselves professionally, office staff provide an environment that ensures patient confidence. Patients need to feel safe in the office and that their information is being handled respectfully and professionally.

  1. Cleanliness is next to Godliness. It is important to have a clean and well-maintained appearance. Cleanliness is paramount in a medical office. Unclean bodies and hair can be alarming for patients, but even simple things like ripped clothing, wrinkled clothing or improperly fitting clothing can project an environment that fails to take patient health and safety seriously. Meanwhile, meticulous dress and appearance help project the idea that cleanliness, orderliness and professionalism are important and therefore, so are patient health and safety.
  2. Accessories. Understated accessories including hair, nails, make-up and tattoos keep the focus on the patient and not on the staff. Drawing attention with large jewelry or visible tattoos can unintentionally project the idea that the patient is secondary. Also, extreme hair, excessive make-up and long nails can give patients the idea that their health and safety is not the primary focus in the office.
  3. Shoes. While many medical professionals spend hours on their feet, they should exercise care when selecting footwear. Especially for medical professionals in scrubs, shoes can stand out to patients so, it is important to make sure they are not only comfortable, but maintain a professional appearance. Dansko-style clogs are good examples of acceptable shoes, while snow boots, slipper-style shoes, Converse or other athletic shoes, Uggs, cowboy boots, and high heels are examples of shoes that should not be worn in a medical environment.
  4. Clothing. A medical professional should wear clothing that is classic, professional, and well-fitted. It should allow the employee to project confidence and professionalism, which will in turn provide patients with reassurance that their lives are in good hands. Clothing that is revealing, offensive (as in t-shirts with messages on them), or made of any material that either sheds (like sequins or glitter) or is not considered professional (like jeans, leather or spandex)should not be worn.

By dressing in a professional and timeless fashion, the employee allows for the focus to remain where it belongs, on the patient. Employees in the medical office should consistently review their attire to make sure it projects the idea, from the patient’s perspective, that the primary focus in the office is on the safety and comfort of its patients.

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Professional Dress in the Medical Office: A quick guide

A big part of any job is appropriate dress. While some companies will provide uniforms, many office jobs leave it to the employee’s discretion. Sometimes knowing what is appropriate is difficult, especially when you are trying to add some color or style to your daily wardrobe. Avidity Medical Design understands that success comes from both knowledge and appearance, and want to provide you with a clear list of things to avoid when selecting an outfit for the office. Even though they specialize in course creation for the medical field, they also offer advice on maintaining professionalism and other challenges in the workplace. Check out their blog for other great informative pieces!

professional dress in the medical officeYour clothes should fit you properly, match, and be clean.

Your outfit says a lot about you, especially when you are at work. If your clothes are don’t fit, have clashing colors, or obvious stains and smells, it lets people know work was probably not a priority for you. So when you’re evaluating clothes, avoid items that your are either hanging out of, swimming in, or are otherwise unflattering. Don’t forget that the sales staff are there to help you select items that fit and match appropriately. Take advantage of this if you are unsure! Likewise, the cleanliness of your clothing is just as important as your own personal hygiene, and even more so in a medical setting. Taking the extra step to clean and maintain your clothes sends a strong message to your employer and your clients.

Avoid clothes designed for working out or relaxing.

You’re work clothes need to be comfortable. Don’t be distracted by ill-fitting or otherwise uncomfortable clothing when youshould be focused on work. However, some items are just a bit too comfortable. Workout clothes are great for working out and everyone should have some comfy sweats for after work or the weekends. But when you dress like this at work, you’re sending a message similar to the previous point; that you don’t want to be there. If you could run a marathon or watch a marathon in what you’re wearing, don’t wear it to work.

Logos or other messages aside from work related

Try and avoid clothing that advertises for bands, beverages, designer companies, or have jokes and slogans written on them. It’s distracting, unprofessional, and sends a bad message to the customer. The exceptions are items that have company logos on them, or are related to office events, such as a company sponsored 5k run or picnic. Even then, such items should be reserved for a casual day, if applicable.

Keep your face friendly and approachable!

Your smiling face is your best attribute, letting patients and clients know that they are safe and welcome. While society’s views are changing on the issue of tattoos, piercings, and dyed/extreme hair and makeup, keep in mind that you’re representing your office and therefore have an image to upkeep. The rule is to cover up anything that might make a customer feel uncomfortable. Professional attire covers the majority of your body, giving you more than enough room for tattoos or piercings. When choosing a hairstyle, try to select one that can be tamed during the workday to look presentable. And makeup can be light and subtle in the office, to keep with the theme of a warm and welcoming office to the public. The best rule to keep in mind is to tone it down or cover it up!

Sheila McCray, the person behind Avidity Medical Design, wants to help turn good students into great professionals. She also works to design and create courses in instructional design for medicine and healthcare, medical course analysis and recommendations, and medical subject matter expertise. If you are interested in these services, contact Avidity Medical Design, and follow them on Twitter!

How truly inspired learning brings your medical training to life

Online healthcare courses are the norm for today’s budding medical students. Most students dread the boring, two-dimensional, rote learning of “online courses.” Online healthcare courses don’t have to take the inspiration out of learning. At Avidity, our courses are designed to engage and inspire you! What happened to hands-on anatomy, the engaging questions and answers in pathology or epidemiology? None of these topics are cut and dry – and that is what makes the study and practice of medicine so fascinating.

In a field that is constantly evolving and innovation, the way we learn and transfer that learning into the real world should bejust as exciting. Welcome to Avidity Medical Design, where we bring your online healthcare courses to vivid, vibrant life. Our courses are so uniquely engaging, so completely inspired, they smooth out the inevitable transition from book learning to on-the-spot clinical experience.

How do we do it? Here’s some insight into how to transfer your online training directly to the medical office:

how to transfer your training to the medical officeThe right tools for the job

The world of online healthcare course design is a lot bigger than most people realize. Why shouldn’t we be usingDreamweaver, Captivate, and Sharepoint in addition to introducing the standard medical software? Sheila D. McCray, MS, CCS, CCS-P, principal of Avidity Medical Design, holds certifications in all these applications and more. She brings her vast experience in medical coding and software design to bear in Avidity’s online health courses.

Captivating visuals of anatomy and biological processes brilliantly animated come to life before your eyes. Because Sheila holds a Master’s in Instructional and Performance Technology, the courses she designs for Avidity illuminate medical billing, coding, and statistics like you’ve never seen them before.

An engaged learner is a real-world doer

Because our online courses aim to engage all your senses, and to present information in new, innovative ways, you graduate with an internalized understanding of real-world, clinical applications of all your learning. It is not enough to memorize by rote. Medical offices are anything but predictable, rote, and routine! Avidity’s online healthcare courses transfer your engaged learning directly to your new medical career, doing what you love.

The more engaged you are with the material, the easier it is to transfer your training to the medical office. Contact us to get started with the most exciting online healthcare courses today!